Friday, April 10, 2009

Sites that had the worst internet trolls in 2008

According to NetCraft, several sites referred more traffic to troll attacks in progress than any other sites on the internet. When researchers went back to the sites in question, they found trolls organizing themselves to destroy the target sites.

Here are the top five troll sites on the internet:

WARNING: SITES CONTAIN OFFENSIVE CONTENT
WARNING: SITES CONTAIN OFFENSIVE CONTENT


If you see these sites in your logs at the same time you get a sudden spike in traffic, you should investigate it. Trolls specialize in posting anything that is perceived as socially offensive, yet has a grain to truth of it -- giving it the controversy they thrive on. Heading them off at the pass can stop your site from becoming an unending flame war.

Beherit identifies problem with black metal


Terrorizer: Has it been an easy transition to slide back into the metal world? Is there anything you're looking forward to? Anything you dread?

Holocausto: That's true, but what's so significant happening in metal music for the last ten years? There's not much innovation, except the sad fact that quite amount of metalheads moved to entertainment business. Hipsters flood over bulletin boards and black metal bands sounds like happy carnival melody music? I respect only handful of newer bands and talking about your metal world in general, I would rather go back to my cave.

Terrorizer Beherit interview


For those who are curious about such things, this is why bands like Beherit lead: the people behind them are realists, intelligent, and also care about the romance of life -- such as producing great art, art which values intensity of experience over safety; Satanic art, not God-will-save-your-dumb-ass art.

Wednesday, April 08, 2009

Pentti Linkola "Can Life Prevail?" released in English -- possibly the most important environmentalist book of this year.

First the press release, then an explanation as to why this is important:


Corrupt together with its publishing arm Integral Tradition present the hottest book on environmentalism and deep ecology this year: Pentti Linkola’s “Can Life Prevail?”. A brand new English translation of the latest work by this internationally famous ecophilosopher from Finland, including an exclusive foreword written by our columnist Brett Stevens.

CORRUPT.org


Pentti Linkola is an environmentalist from the old school, called a conservationist. Conservationists realize that whatever land is open for human use gets sold, and eventually gets converted into cities, suburbs or farms.

However, animals and plants need open space -- unbroken by roads, fences and walls -- in which to reproduce and interact. Each creature needs a certain amount of acreage and a certain amount of roaming space, or they clash and eliminate each other. Worse, without open space natural selection is interrupted, and they become inbred.

Pentti Linkola, like Aldous Huxley before him, realized that a society based on the fulfillment of individual desire has no STOP button. It keeps expanding because each individual wants as much as he can get. Even worse, individuals get bitter because they do not feel fulfilled because society does not address their non-material needs.

However, Linkola was too smart to believe in the dogmas of left or right. Communism, he saw, was so focused on material equality that it could not stop expansion. The right wing, who believe in a libertarian form of social Darwinism, did not take into account the damage done by individuals pursuing "freedom" in material form.

Instead, he realized that a new form of politics was needed, one based on reverence for things outside of us, and as a result, the ability to tell ourselves and others "NO" when individual desires threaten to promote reckless expansion.

Linkola sees that we already exist in a time of radical evil where our personal fears and desires have trumped all sense, making a chaotic mess that consumes everything it touches. Even more, he sees how politics has devolved into material infighting and ignored nature.

Read this book for an insight into how we can fix our environmental problem and make ourselves spiritually stronger, through the Zen of learning to appreciate nature and struggle.

While most "environmentalists" are going to tell you to recycle condoms and buy green lightbulbs, Linkola offers you the hardline reality and doesn't take any prisoners. In doing so, he shows how the solutions we need are readily accessible if we can just open our minds to them.